non-Met Police ****ery

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Imrael
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by Imrael » Tue Mar 05, 2024 2:54 pm

discovolante wrote:
Thu Feb 29, 2024 11:39 am
I've been reflecting on how differently the police treat me in different contexts. I wonder if anyone else has similar experiences. When I'm at court for work, looking vaguely professional and it's clear who (or rather what), the police are an absolute delight. Friendly and helpful and go out of their way to help if I need anything. Which is nice. Except they're totally different when I see them approaching or arresting people. And they are cold and slightly intimidating if I'm say, at a protest (I know much worse for others). When I did a brief stint of police station representation it was a bit variable, I would say largely professional but with a hint of 'I'm being this way because I have to'. When I was at a demo yesterday (in Scotland) they were fine because they knew we were no trouble as it was all nice middle class middle aged people.

Obviously the police across the UK consists of many many individuals, but the fact that I'm treated with much more respect (almost bordering on deference) in some contexts and borderline contempt in others, even though I'm not committing an offence, gives me the creeps a bit.

I'm not saying this for it to be about me though, I've never to date had any actual problems with them, just felt like commenting on it.

Also this is the Met so wrong thread but Señor von Laté is currently in London and on one street they have live facial recognition cameras set up. There is a sign saying you don't have to walk down the street if you don't want to...
I've never had any real issues either. Stop-and-searched a few times as a long haired student in the late 70's - I used to help with student theatre and often travel home late at night with something that looked like a tool bag, so probably looked like a burglar.

My guess is that police are worse to deal with the more of them are present, partly because of the situations when they are grouped together, and partly because it encourages an "us and them" mentality. Oddly, the few traffic stops I've had were extremel;y polite.

I do remember a random breath test of all members leaving a car club christmas dinner. Being a car club we were all very fond of our licences, which made for a very unproductive evening. Policeman was obviously a bit bored by my turn.

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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by monkey » Tue Mar 05, 2024 4:48 pm

TopBadger wrote:
Tue Mar 05, 2024 2:21 pm
Police getting a drumming in the media today for forcefully stripping naked a female in a young offenders institute by a group of all male officers.

Apparently she was trying to kill herself with her clothing and so the decision was taken to remove her clothing. The group that oversaw this were all male because there were no female officer(s) available (reports are there was a female officer on the rosta but she wasn't available having been assaulted earlier by an offender). If they had respected the offenders modesty and she'd hanged herself wouldn't that be worse? I'm assuming they didn't have the staffing levels to keep her clothes on and have an officer stand watch on her cell.

Honestly I'm not sure what they could have done differently given the situation they were in. And we're certainly not going to get better quality of policing and care of offenders with the reported cut in NI and service provisions expected to happen in the budget.
Not police! Prison officers.

Still non-met and fuckery though. Seems adequate staffing of female officers is/was the problem to me.

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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by jimbob » Wed Mar 06, 2024 10:18 am

TopBadger wrote:
Tue Mar 05, 2024 2:21 pm
Police getting a drumming in the media today for forcefully stripping naked a female in a young offenders institute by a group of all male officers.

Apparently she was trying to kill herself with her clothing and so the decision was taken to remove her clothing. The group that oversaw this were all male because there were no female officer(s) available (reports are there was a female officer on the rosta but she wasn't available having been assaulted earlier by an offender). If they had respected the offenders modesty and she'd hanged herself wouldn't that be worse? I'm assuming they didn't have the staffing levels to keep her clothes on and have an officer stand watch on her cell.

Honestly I'm not sure what they could have done differently given the situation they were in. And we're certainly not going to get better quality of policing and care of offenders with the reported cut in NI and service provisions expected to happen in the budget.
The chief inspector of prisons explained it in the Today programme yesterday.

It happened twice and was entirely predictable (his words).

Once would have been unfortunate (paraphrase of his words) but it was the fact they'd not done anything since the first time that was why he was so critical of it.
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by TopBadger » Wed Mar 06, 2024 10:44 am

Thing is, even if you know its going to happen again that doesn't guarantee you can do anything differently next time.

I was speaking to a friend of a friend at a wedding last summer, he's a prison governor. The picture he painted was grim... they don't have the manpower to do the job properly because they don't have the funding. Telling the prison service to simply "do better" doesn't address the shortage of resources and so nothing will change.

It's the same thing with the ambulance service... repeatedly in the news we are told that someone in a critical condition passed away because an ambulance couldn't be dispatched, because there simply weren't enough of them.

Yet we're about to see a budget with f.cking tax cuts. It makes my blood boil.
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by Grumble » Wed Mar 06, 2024 9:22 pm

TopBadger wrote:
Wed Mar 06, 2024 10:44 am
Thing is, even if you know its going to happen again that doesn't guarantee you can do anything differently next time.

I was speaking to a friend of a friend at a wedding last summer, he's a prison governor. The picture he painted was grim... they don't have the manpower to do the job properly because they don't have the funding. Telling the prison service to simply "do better" doesn't address the shortage of resources and so nothing will change.

It's the same thing with the ambulance service... repeatedly in the news we are told that someone in a critical condition passed away because an ambulance couldn't be dispatched, because there simply weren't enough of them.

Yet we're about to see a budget with f.cking tax cuts. It makes my blood boil.
If we’re seeing a budget with tax cuts why are taxes at their highest since 1948? Is it all because of Kwasi Kwarteng f.cking the economy?
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by monkey » Thu Mar 07, 2024 3:31 am

Grumble wrote:
Wed Mar 06, 2024 9:22 pm
If we’re seeing a budget with tax cuts why are taxes at their highest since 1948? Is it all because of Kwasi Kwarteng f.cking the economy?
That'll happen when you've got high inflation and wages going up but GDP doesn't.

I'm not sure you can blame that on just Kwarteng, but I don't think he helped.

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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by nekomatic » Thu Mar 07, 2024 2:50 pm

Grumble wrote:
Wed Mar 06, 2024 9:22 pm
If we’re seeing a budget with tax cuts why are taxes at their highest since 1948? Is it all because of Kwasi Kwarteng f.cking the economy?
https://mainlymacro.blogspot.com/2024/0 ... y.html?m=1 addresses this
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by jimbob » Fri Mar 08, 2024 5:20 pm

https://www.internationalskeptics.com/f ... st14274462
Nessie wrote:
Darat;14268810 wrote:Angiolini: "Good police officers work alongside those who abuse their powers, behave inappropriately with their colleagues and do a disservice to the profession of policing,.."

How can they be considered "good police officers"? Their entire justification is to prevent such behaviour - in everyone - not just non-police officers.
I was one of those good cops, who worked with bad cops. In retirement, I have talked with my cops friends, who were also good cops as to why we did not see those bad cop behaviours and the reason was that the bad cops behaved themselves when they were in the company of a majority of good cops. We all experienced situations where we knew we were being excluded from what was going on, which will have been the bad cops doing bad things. I remember being suddenly sent out of the office to go on patrol and I knew something was up, but I was happy to go as I did not want to be involved.

Whatsapp etc only came in at the end of my career, but I was never invited to join any private group.

I was told on numerous occasions by female cops how much they enjoyed working with me. I just thought they were being nice, I now know it was because I never hassled any of them. I was also told later in my career, when I bumped into a cop I had been a training college with, that at the time, I was singled out by the female cops as the only trustworthy male.

That is how good cops work alongside bad cops.
Interesting take on this
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by discovolante » Fri Mar 08, 2024 8:39 pm

I'm not blaming that good cop, but I assume the female cops generally knew who the 'bad cops' were, even if they hadn't experienced their behaviour directly, but he didn't.
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by jimbob » Fri Mar 08, 2024 9:40 pm

discovolante wrote:
Fri Mar 08, 2024 8:39 pm
I'm not blaming that good cop, but I assume the female cops generally knew who the 'bad cops' were, even if they hadn't experienced their behaviour directly, but he didn't.
The first reply to that was also interesting
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by shpalman » Fri Apr 26, 2024 12:47 pm

having that swing is a necessary but not sufficient condition for it meaning a thing
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by shpalman » Sun May 05, 2024 11:45 am

Matteo Falcinelli, an Italian student in Miami, asks police for help getting his phone back from a nightclub, but the police can't be bothered, and instead he's violently arrested, restrained, and detained for two days for his trouble.
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by Gfamily » Tue May 07, 2024 8:28 am

In this case, the ****ery was a completely inadequate response leading to the investigation running out of time for it to be investigated

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/ck7l8ey1v33o
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by jimbob » Tue May 07, 2024 11:37 am

Gfamily wrote:
Tue May 07, 2024 8:28 am
In this case, the ****ery was a completely inadequate response leading to the investigation running out of time for it to be investigated

https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/articles/ck7l8ey1v33o
Yup.

He's a danger
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by jimbob » Tue May 07, 2024 2:59 pm

Beyond cosplay, there's no benign reason to impersonate a police officer. It's a crime to enable more serious crime
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by Fishnut » Tue May 07, 2024 3:41 pm

A quick round-up of stories from the last few weeks:

Ex-PC stalker who tracked wife and lover avoids jail
He was found guilty of aggravated stalking which included secretly bugging Ms Glynn's car, listening to her conservations, tracking her whereabouts and taking her phone without her permission.
He was given a two-year suspended sentence and a seven-year restraining order to prevent him contacting his ex-wife.

Ex-police officer to face court accused of forming relationships with victims
Jason Catton, who worked for Sussex Police, faces eight counts of the charge after a police watchdog investigated allegations of abusing his position for a sexual purpose.
Former Nottinghamshire Police officer jailed for speeding with sirens on without proper reason
Ryan Lee was sacked by Nottinghamshire Police last month after reaching speeds of up to 101mph and having his blue lights on while travelling to Worksop police station last year - despite having no policing reason to do so... In the video the former police officer turned on his lights, reached speeds of 101mph in a 50mph zone... Judge Richardson observed that Lee had been driving on the wrong side of the road and overtaking on solid white lines.
Former police officer jailed after suspended sentence appealed
Matthew Longmate, 48, formerly of Derbyshire Constabulary, had been given a 12-month jail sentence, suspended for a year, after he was found guilty of a single count of misconduct in a public office in November, relating to sexual contact with a woman in his patrol car.

Following an appeal by the CPS, supported by the force, who deemed the sentence unduly lenient, the Judge removed the suspended aspect of his conviction, with Longmate subsequently being jailed for 11 months (12 months minus unpaid work served).
Bolton police officer who abused his position to share confidential
information jailed
Akeel Kadir, 54, accessed secure systems and confidential information as well as images of crime suspects and personal details of people investigated for sexual offences.

He was found guilty of one count of conspiracy to commit police corruption and one count of knowingly or recklessly obtaining or disclosing personal data without the consent of the data controller, at Liverpool Crown Court in March 2024.
Police officer stole dead man's phones and iPad
A Police Scotland officer stole a dead man’s phones and iPad when attending to investigate his death at his grieving family’s home.
Ex-police officer who shared photo of dead body he took while on duty jailed
Lewis Wood, 43, from Bridgwater, admitted sharing images and videos with family and friends on a number of occasions while serving with Avon and Somerset Police.

These included photos of the body of 39-year-old Paul Wells, who was killed in a homicide incident in Highbridge in 2020, Exeter Crown Court was told.
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by jimbob » Tue May 07, 2024 3:48 pm

Fishnut wrote:
Tue May 07, 2024 3:41 pm
A quick round-up of stories from the last few weeks:

Ex-PC stalker who tracked wife and lover avoids jail
He was found guilty of aggravated stalking which included secretly bugging Ms Glynn's car, listening to her conservations, tracking her whereabouts and taking her phone without her permission.
He was given a two-year suspended sentence and a seven-year restraining order to prevent him contacting his ex-wife.

Ex-police officer to face court accused of forming relationships with victims
Jason Catton, who worked for Sussex Police, faces eight counts of the charge after a police watchdog investigated allegations of abusing his position for a sexual purpose.
Former Nottinghamshire Police officer jailed for speeding with sirens on without proper reason
Ryan Lee was sacked by Nottinghamshire Police last month after reaching speeds of up to 101mph and having his blue lights on while travelling to Worksop police station last year - despite having no policing reason to do so... In the video the former police officer turned on his lights, reached speeds of 101mph in a 50mph zone... Judge Richardson observed that Lee had been driving on the wrong side of the road and overtaking on solid white lines.
Former police officer jailed after suspended sentence appealed
Matthew Longmate, 48, formerly of Derbyshire Constabulary, had been given a 12-month jail sentence, suspended for a year, after he was found guilty of a single count of misconduct in a public office in November, relating to sexual contact with a woman in his patrol car.

Following an appeal by the CPS, supported by the force, who deemed the sentence unduly lenient, the Judge removed the suspended aspect of his conviction, with Longmate subsequently being jailed for 11 months (12 months minus unpaid work served).
Bolton police officer who abused his position to share confidential
information jailed
Akeel Kadir, 54, accessed secure systems and confidential information as well as images of crime suspects and personal details of people investigated for sexual offences.

He was found guilty of one count of conspiracy to commit police corruption and one count of knowingly or recklessly obtaining or disclosing personal data without the consent of the data controller, at Liverpool Crown Court in March 2024.
Police officer stole dead man's phones and iPad
A Police Scotland officer stole a dead man’s phones and iPad when attending to investigate his death at his grieving family’s home.
Ex-police officer who shared photo of dead body he took while on duty jailed
Lewis Wood, 43, from Bridgwater, admitted sharing images and videos with family and friends on a number of occasions while serving with Avon and Somerset Police.

These included photos of the body of 39-year-old Paul Wells, who was killed in a homicide incident in Highbridge in 2020, Exeter Crown Court was told.
Amazing how many bad apples
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by Fishnut » Tue May 07, 2024 3:49 pm

jimbob wrote:
Tue May 07, 2024 3:48 pm
Amazing how many bad apples
At this rate they're going to need a prison just for former police officers
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by Fishnut » Mon Jun 17, 2024 10:09 am

Another in my irregular series of 'bad apples'...

Lancashire police constable Cameron Lee Hanson attended a murder in October 2021 and used his personal phone to take video of the body and then sent it to his wife, Kirstie Hanson, who worked as a police civilian worker. She then shared it with colleagues.
Other misconduct included unauthorised access to police computer systems, disclosure of private and sensitive information, and 'mockery of vulnerable members of the public.
Cameron jailed for 32 months and Kirstie was jailed for 18 months.

----

Essex PC Eugene Robinson has been sacked for gross misconduct after he repeatedly phoned a woman and used police computers to obtain information on her.
Robinson "repeatedly" made unwanted contact towards his victim by calling her a number of times between April 30 and May 27, 2023. He also repeatedly used police computers to obtain information on her and a previous partner without a valid reason to do so.
We get the standard 'bad apple' statement at the end of the article.

----

Met PC Luke Stokes sent sexual messages to people on a Coast to Coast train,
The hearing was told that Stokes sent messages of a sexual nature through AirDrop to passengers, including a 16-year-old girl, on a C2C train on April 9, 2022.
In their report, the panel wrote,
"This is made all the worse when it became apparent that he had previously sent a picture of his penis to a fellow MPS staff member despite her request that he not do so..."
He resigned before he was sacked and has been added to the barred list.

----

South Wales police officer Lewis Edwards has lost his appeal over his life sentence. He was 24 years old when he admitted to 160 counts of child sexual abuse and blackmail. He messaged 210 girls aged 10 to 16 from November 2020 until February 2023 and images of 207 of them were found on his devices. He had 4,500 indecent images of children.
Cardiff Crown Court heard last year that he threatened to bomb the house of one victim and shoot her parents if she stopped sending him images, with many victims self-harming, feeling suicidal and developing anxiety and depression as a result of Edwards’s offending... Edwards, who joined South Wales Police in January 2021 and resigned during criminal proceedings, met all but one of his victims while he was an officer and had contact with his victims on 30 occasions while on duty.
----

An unnamed Surrey police officer has been removed from frontline duty while they are investigated for ramming a young cow with their police car. Video shows the cow walking down a suburban street in the dark and then from out nowhere a police car rams the cow, causing it to fall and roll multiple times down the road. Miraculously, it gets up but the car backs up and then rams it again. The cow then stays on the ground. The disproportionality of the response is incredible.
A Surrey police spokesperson said they tried to safely capture the cow over a number of hours and explored several options before hitting it with a car. The force said the matter had been referred to its professional standards department.

Ch Insp Sam Adcock said: “I know that this has caused distress and I’d like to thank the community for their concern. The decision to use the police car is one that was only taken after other methods to stop the cow had failed.
They said they couldn't find a vet. I've just googled 'Feltham vets emergency' and got three hits, all with 24-hour emergency contacts. Cows aren't particularly smart and the fact she outwitted Surrey's finest for several hours is really not a good look for them, even before they decided the best solution was to ram it.
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by tenchboy » Mon Jun 17, 2024 12:14 pm

All they had to do was walk down the road rattling a bucket of stones (to mimic feed pellets): the calf woulda followed them anywhere they wanted to take it. (And maybe a bit of blue water pipe for authenticity).
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by Fishnut » Mon Jun 17, 2024 11:31 pm

Incredibly the chair of the National Farmers’ Union’s livestock board east says the police 'probably did the right thing' because apparently the only alternatives would have been to either shoot the cow or using tranquilliser darts.
“While the whole thing looks horrendous, and it is for everyone, they probably did the right thing at the time. God forbid it had gone the other way and the animal ran off and bumped into someone, sent a child flying, sent any person flying, [which is] perfectly possible, and they were seriously injured or worse. People would be saying: ‘Why wasn’t the animal stopped?’”
Surrey police say they received reports of a cow running loose in Staines-Upon-Thames at 8.55pm on Friday. The Independent report that police arrived 'on the scene' around 9pm,
and attempted to capture the cow, which was feared to have the potential to cause a road traffic accident, for two hours.

When these attempts failed, the decision was taken to incapacitate the animal at around 11 pm by ramming it with a 4x4.
For all their apparent concerns about people being hurt by the cow, they do this as a man is jogging/running past. There's a stationary police car with police officers outside but he seems shocked to see the other car hit the cow - it doesn't seem like they gave him any warning and didn't care that they were ramming the cow into his general direction.
Before cow is hit.jpg
Before cow is hit.jpg (16.04 KiB) Viewed 1644 times
After cow is hit.jpg
After cow is hit.jpg (14.82 KiB) Viewed 1644 times
Part of me thinks it's silly to focus on this story rather than, say, the paedophilia, harassment or yet more officers sharing images of dead people. But I think it encapsulates a lot of what's wrong with the current approach to policing. They take a situation that isn't dangerous, but could be, and end up inflicting disproportionate violence because they lack the skills to resolve it any other way.

Cows are domesticated. I know we hear reports of people being injured and killed by them from time to time but they're usually mothers with calves being protective and generally they really aren't that dangerous, just big and intimidating especially if you're not used to them. This cow is walking along largely empty streets. It's more at risk of getting injured than it is of injuring someone.

Enter the police. They spend two hours trying to apprehend this cow. There's no detail of how they attempted this, but it seems that two police cars and an unknown number of officers are involved. They claim they couldn't get hold of a vet. As someone who's had pets and required an emergency vet a couple of times I can tell you this doesn't pass the sniff test. Every vet I know has a recorded message with a number for an on-call vet who will answer out of hours. I can see why it would have been harder to find out who owned the cow but again, I find it incredible that the police couldn't track down a single farmer for advice on how to approach the situation. I've just stuck 'farm' into google maps when centred on Staines and come up with loads of hits. You'd have thought someone could have gone and knocked on a door or found a phone number and called for help. They are, after all, supposed to be good at investigating stuff.

So, after two hours of doing who knows what but likely behaviour that has just got the cow more distressed, the only thing they can think of doing is ramming her with a car.

It reminds me of that Simpson's quote, "we've tried nothing and we're all out of ideas".

I'm not expecting suburban police officers to know how to deal with a runaway cow. What I am expecting is that they have some ability to use the resources available to them to find a solution that doesn't involve injuring - potentially fatally - an animal who isn't really a risk to anyone. I've been able to find vets and farmers on Google in less than a minute. These people have databases and god knows what else to hand. I can't even find myself that angry at the driver because I don't believe that they took the decision to ram the cow by themselves, there were other people around and not one of them could come up with any better ideas. Even just encouraging the cow into a cul-de-sac and then using police cars to trap it while waiting for a vet would have been something.

From what I can tell, the cow was hit here. In less than a third of a mile there are three cul-de-sacs that could have been used to trap it.
Cul-de-sacs (red dot - where cow was hit; black dots - cul-de-sacs).jpg
Cul-de-sacs (red dot - where cow was hit; black dots - cul-de-sacs).jpg (12.75 KiB) Viewed 1644 times
The police have taken a potentially but likely not dangerous situation and escalated it, using violence unnecessarily because these people who we task to do things like find criminals are incapable of finding a vet or a farmer.

And now the excuses come.

The police issue a statement the following day in which they said,
...officers were extremely concerned about the public’s safety, and over a period of a number of hours tried a number of options to safely capture the cow.

Unfortunately, these were unsuccessful, and the decision was made to stop it using a police car.
...
With support from a member of the public, the cow was moved to a nearby farm in the early hours of this morning (15 June). The owner has been located and the cow’s injuries have been assessed by a vet.


It's interesting that this statement makes no mention of them not being able to get hold of a vet before the cow was rammed, it makes me wonder if they did actually try or whether they started saying that they did after the fact when questioned on it. It's also worth noting how they underplay the violence of the decision. They decided to 'stop it', even though a better description would have been 'run it over' or 'hit it'.

The Commissioner also made a statement, which included this gem,
“There is much speculation on social media, which does not necessarily reflect the situation, which was ongoing for a number of hours, or the difficult decisions facing officers on the ground at the time.
Again, see how they are making things sound worse than they were to justify their actions.

It was a 'situation', which is a word that could mean anything from 'the swan's escaped' to 'armed attackers have raided a bank and taken staff and customers hostage'. They want you to think it's at the more severe end of the scale but honestly this could have been a scene from Hot Fuzz if it weren't for the fact they ended it in the least funny way possible.

It was 'a number of hours' - that makes it sound like they'd been going for ages and hadn't got anywhere. It was 2 hours - they arrived on the 'scene' around 9pm and hit it around 11pm. That's barely the length of a film these days.

The officers faced 'difficult decisions'. It was a cow, on deserted streets in the middle of the night. If they can't handle that without resorting to 'let's hit it with our car' then how on earth are they supposed to handle actually dangerous situations?

The statement is trying to make you think that the officers were under a lot of pressure and risk and did what they needed to do to end a potentially life-threatening situation. What we actually have is a bunch of officers who were seemingly outwitted by a 9 month old cow and couldn't think of anything other than hit it with their car.
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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by IvanV » Fri Jun 21, 2024 11:38 am

If the chief constable of Northants can be dismissed for the relatively harmless offence of exaggeration of his CV (BBC), you'd think that police officers who do really bad stuff would be quaking in their shoes at the risk of dismissal. But somehow it doesn't work like that.

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Re: non-Met Police ****ery

Post by Fishnut » Sun Jun 23, 2024 12:12 am

A bevy of sexual predators who got be police officers, and in some cases used their position of power to predate on women:

Retired police officer John Price has appeared in court after being accused of sex offences against young girls.
...he faced 18 charges which date from between 2011 and 2022 and mostly involve girls aged under 13. The 71-year old retired as a police sergeant 24 years ago.
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The charges included four of rape, and four of sexual assault of a child under 13, and causing or inciting a child under 13 to engage in sexual activity, making indecent images, voyeurism and a n alleged assault a child under 13 by penetration.
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Former Greater Manchester police officer Shamraze Arshad has been jailed for having sex with a vulnerable woman while on duty. He met the woman when he and a colleague were called out to do a welfare check on the woman who was suicidal. After she was taken to hospital he looked up her details on police systems and called her, then began a 'friends with benefits' relationship with her.

We get the standard 'bad apple' quote in the article, this time from Detective Chief Inspector Dave Jones, of GMP's Professional Standards Directorate,
Arshad’s jail term is fully deserved. He is a disgrace to the police service and does not represent the thousands of professional, honest, hard-working police officers across Greater Manchester who continue to protect the public each and every day.
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Former Kent police officer Jamie Woodhams has been charged with six counts of rape and one count of sexual assault against women he met while on duty.

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Former Police Scotland officer Christopher Ferguson has been found guilty of violent offences against women. The articles I've found are just reprints of the press statement which lack any details.

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Former West Midlands police officer Aron May has been found guilty of raping a woman twice. He was sentenced to 12 years in jail.

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Yahoo News have started noticing how many police officers are sexual predators and have a little list of their own.
it's okay to say "I don't know"

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