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GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 2:15 pm
by EACLucifer
Right. I've got this done at last. By all means feel free to distribute.

The masks are based on these, which were part of a drive to equip US healthcare workers.. I've made the following changes to increase speed of production and comfort;

1 - Use of one piece of folded material rather than two pieces joined together saves on one seam, but more importantly it means when making batches where slight size variation of fabric pieces is inevitable, there is no issue of matching sizes of panels.
2 - Reduction of pleats from three to one, as it doesn't seem to make any difference in fit and one is radically quicker and easier
3 - I think I've changed the point at which the elastic is attached, but I'm not certain as the guide I've linked to is so unclear
4 - I've switched from behind the ear elastic loops to straps across the back of the head to increase comfort and security. This still allows the mast to be safely removed while only touching the elastic. This can be changed back easily enough if desired, and this is included in the guide.

If someone with better graphic design skills* wants to improve on this, drop me a private message and I'll send you the raw images. Please share this widely. As far as I'm concerned, this is now public domain, with just one stipulation - please be responsible when sharing this, and do not give people an unrealistic impression of what these masks can do. I've linked to studies on mask use in general and on cloth masks in this thread here, which should give some idea as to what responsible guidance is. These are not at all meant to be a substitute for any other measure to reduce spread, eg handwashing, physical distancing.
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Basic Masks 3.jpg
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Ctd as it doesn't want to let me add more attachments...


*I'd got a sizeable way into writing this guide using blackletter font before realising that while I find it easier to read, I'm really unusual in this regard.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 2:16 pm
by EACLucifer
Ctd from post 1
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Ctd in one more post...

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Tue Apr 07, 2020 2:16 pm
by EACLucifer
Final image...
Basic Masks 7.jpg
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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Wed Apr 08, 2020 9:51 pm
by Bird on a Fire
This is great, thank you EACLucifer.

I especially like how you've explained the purpose for each step, which is really helpful for beginners!

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Thu Apr 09, 2020 7:18 am
by discovolante
Thank you very much for all your efforts with this.

I don't have a sewing machine and am a very average sewer. I could order the elastic etc online of course. In fact I could order a sewing machine but they are pricey and I'd need to start a whole new thread asking how to pick one. However this link has how to make masks without a sewing machine: https://www.theguardian.com/us-news/202 ... oronavirus what do you think of them as a substitute?

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Thu Apr 16, 2020 12:24 pm
by Tessa K
I made a couple this morning although I ran out of elastic before finishing the second one. I had one from the local chemist and used that for sizing. I couldn't be bothered to get the ancient machine out so I hand stitched them.

I folded a piece of fabric in half, folded in and pinned a seam allowance all round the edges and then top stitched it (with a small running stitch) with pleats in the mid section. The one I bought had three small pleats but I used two, which works fine. They're slightly bigger than the bought one, coming a bit further down the chin but that's OK. I only had very thin elastic on a reel so I doubled it up. I have a vague memory that Sainsbury's has elastic in the small sewing section so I'll have a look next time I go. I think they'll need more substantial elastic than I have.

They aren't surgical quality but they will hopefully serve to remind people to keep back from me. That and me snarling at them. Once I've got elastic and perfected the design, I'll post a pic. If I get bored I may embroider them. One is dark red, one is purple and white batik for when I feel fancy.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Thu Apr 16, 2020 12:55 pm
by Tessa K
It's a shame we don't have old fashioned knicker elastic in our pants any more.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Tue Apr 21, 2020 7:27 am
by TheScientificHippy
I used these guidelines to assess the work of the sellers on Etsy and have purchased myself some - no sewing machine and the need for two a day with washing in between meant making my own was going to be too much of a faff. Hopefully they will arrive before Sadiq Khan makes them compulsory fo busses.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2020 8:38 pm
by Bird on a Fire
Now that masks are imminently becoming compulsory in the UK (at long last) I thought I'd bump this thread in case anyone is looking for a tried-and-tested design from a Scrutineer!

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Fri Jun 05, 2020 9:16 pm
by Herainestold
Tessa K wrote:
Thu Apr 16, 2020 12:55 pm
It's a shame we don't have old fashioned knicker elastic in our pants any more.
Speak for yourself.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Sat Jun 06, 2020 7:28 am
by Tessa K
I've made a few hand-sewn ones but I don't have a sense of how many I'll need. Do they need to be washed after every wear or would leaving them in 'quarantine' for a couple of days between wears be OK?

At the moment the only outdoor things I'm doing are walking in the parks and going to the supermarket. Once the shops re-open I'll be going to the charity bookshop to stock up too.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Sat Jun 06, 2020 10:44 am
by gosling
I bought four online which are made of four layers of cloth. The most I've used is two in one day. I give them a quick hand wash in hot soapy water after use and they're usually dry again the next day. Though they'll probably get chucked in the washing machine with t-shirts at some point.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Sat Jun 06, 2020 9:48 pm
by Herainestold
gosling wrote:
Sat Jun 06, 2020 10:44 am
I bought four online which are made of four layers of cloth. The most I've used is two in one day. I give them a quick hand wash in hot soapy water after use and they're usually dry again the next day. Though they'll probably get chucked in the washing machine with t-shirts at some point.
Yeah I heard on Joe Schwarcz podcast just hand wash soap and water, hang in sun to dry.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Sat Jun 06, 2020 9:53 pm
by EACLucifer
Tessa K wrote:
Sat Jun 06, 2020 7:28 am
I've made a few hand-sewn ones but I don't have a sense of how many I'll need. Do they need to be washed after every wear or would leaving them in 'quarantine' for a couple of days between wears be OK?

At the moment the only outdoor things I'm doing are walking in the parks and going to the supermarket. Once the shops re-open I'll be going to the charity bookshop to stock up too.
I'd advise you to validate this for yourself and am wary of giving health advice, however, the survival time of viable covid on surfaces isn't immensely long. Leaving it for days is probably safe, but I am not a doctor. I've been using this approach for my half-mask*'s filters and will be using with my gas mask**

*Pre-owned PPE for dealing with cellulose paint fumes

**Military surplus, expired but never issued and likewise for the filter, however inspection suggests it is still fine as an anti-virus mask. Would rather not test it with sarin or sulphur mustard, though.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Sat Jun 06, 2020 10:45 pm
by EACLucifer
Tessa K wrote:
Sat Jun 06, 2020 7:28 am
I've made a few hand-sewn ones but I don't have a sense of how many I'll need. Do they need to be washed after every wear or would leaving them in 'quarantine' for a couple of days between wears be OK?

At the moment the only outdoor things I'm doing are walking in the parks and going to the supermarket. Once the shops re-open I'll be going to the charity bookshop to stock up too.
May not be a perfect answer, but this is what the brilliant Trisha Greenhalgh had to say about it

Image

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 11:43 am
by Tessa K
'Don't fiddle with a dirty one and don't touch anyone else's' - this can apply to most areas of life.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Sun Jun 07, 2020 11:22 pm
by basementer
Via Dr John Campbell, this is the recommended structure for a fabric mask according the WHO:
Fabric masks should consist of at least three layers of different material

Inner layer, an absorbent material like cotton

Middle layer, non-woven material such as polypropylene, which is the filter

Outer layer, non-absorbent material such as polyester or a polyester blend.


From https://www.who.int/docs/default-source ... 858dc773_2

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 3:09 am
by EACLucifer
basementer wrote:
Sun Jun 07, 2020 11:22 pm
Via Dr John Campbell, this is the recommended structure for a fabric mask according the WHO:
Fabric masks should consist of at least three layers of different material

Inner layer, an absorbent material like cotton

Middle layer, non-woven material such as polypropylene, which is the filter

Outer layer, non-absorbent material such as polyester or a polyester blend.


From https://www.who.int/docs/default-source ... 858dc773_2
Should be pretty easy to adapt the design to making it from three layers. Instead of folding, lay the three layers together and stitch all four sides. If you put the middle layer down first, then the outermost layer outside face up, then the lining, then you can turn it inside out to give the correct order. The hole for turning it through will probably need to be slightly enlarged.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Mon Jun 08, 2020 3:35 am
by basementer
EACLucifer wrote:
Mon Jun 08, 2020 3:09 am
basementer wrote:
Sun Jun 07, 2020 11:22 pm
Via Dr John Campbell, this is the recommended structure for a fabric mask according the WHO:
Fabric masks should consist of at least three layers of different material

Inner layer, an absorbent material like cotton

Middle layer, non-woven material such as polypropylene, which is the filter

Outer layer, non-absorbent material such as polyester or a polyester blend.


From https://www.who.int/docs/default-source ... 858dc773_2
Should be pretty easy to adapt the design to making it from three layers. Instead of folding, lay the three layers together and stitch all four sides. If you put the middle layer down first, then the outermost layer outside face up, then the lining, then you can turn it inside out to give the correct order. The hole for turning it through will probably need to be slightly enlarged.
Should there be any doubt, EACLucifer, the WHO only came up with this advice a couple of days ago, I was definitely not trashing your work.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Tue Jun 09, 2020 2:47 pm
by snoozeofreason
Mrs. Snooze has been working on masks for a few weeks now, and has come up with a couple of refinements to provide comfort and elegance to the discerning gentleperson. They could probably be incorporated into any design. The first is a wire along the upper seam that you can mould around the bridge of your nose, as you would with a surgical mask. She finds that soft-twist garden plant tie works well - that's a thicker wire than is used in surgical masks, with a plastic covering that makes it comfortable against the nose. The second is the toggles at the back that you can see in the picture, which saves you from having to tie knots behind your head. She has used shoelaces as a replacement for elastic as well. Much more comfortable.

Image

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Tue Jun 09, 2020 3:49 pm
by EACLucifer
snoozeofreason wrote:
Tue Jun 09, 2020 2:47 pm
Mrs. Snooze has been working on masks for a few weeks now, and has come up with a couple of refinements to provide comfort and elegance to the discerning gentleperson. They could probably be incorporated into any design. The first is a wire along the upper seam that you can mould around the bridge of your nose, as you would with a surgical mask. She finds that soft-twist garden plant tie works well - that's a thicker wire than is used in surgical masks, with a plastic covering that makes it comfortable against the nose. The second is the toggles at the back that you can see in the picture, which saves you from having to tie knots behind your head. She has used shoelaces as a replacement for elastic as well. Much more comfortable.

Image
Both look fantastic.

For context, my mask design was adapted right at the beginning of when this hit, and between me and my former apprentice - mostly him due to my health - we got around four hundred distributed quickly around our community. It was designed to be fast to produce, and definitely has room for refinement, and those with more time to work on it should definitely consider ways of upgrading the fit and comfort, as well as incorporating the WHO's material suggestions.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Tue Jun 09, 2020 4:03 pm
by snoozeofreason
EACLucifer wrote:
Tue Jun 09, 2020 3:49 pm
Both look fantastic.

For context, my mask design was adapted right at the beginning of when this hit, and between me and my former apprentice - mostly him due to my health - we got around four hundred distributed quickly around our community.
Wow! 400 is pretty impressive. Mrs S is getting faster, but she isn't producing at that kind of rate (although she is working on a 70-year old manual Singer sewing machine).

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Wed Jun 10, 2020 5:16 pm
by EACLucifer
snoozeofreason wrote:
Tue Jun 09, 2020 4:03 pm
EACLucifer wrote:
Tue Jun 09, 2020 3:49 pm
Both look fantastic.

For context, my mask design was adapted right at the beginning of when this hit, and between me and my former apprentice - mostly him due to my health - we got around four hundred distributed quickly around our community.
Wow! 400 is pretty impressive. Mrs S is getting faster, but she isn't producing at that kind of rate (although she is working on a 70-year old manual Singer sewing machine).
The credit is overwhelmingly his, not mine. I gave about a dozen out to my neighbours. He did the rest. I did the guide, though, which I have distributed to some people. Depending on how my energy levels go, I might think about doing an updated guide. On the other hand, I'm not dependant on cloth masks any more, so it's not my highest priority in terms of how I use my very limited energy.

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Fri Jul 03, 2020 10:18 am
by jimbob
Bump... and is it worth pinning this?

Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Posted: Fri Jul 03, 2020 10:35 am
by Martin Y
How does one spot spunbond (i.e. non-woven) polypropylene: Where does one get it, or recognise it if you have some already?

We're making new masks for us and more family members and want to follow the different layers advice. WHO, among others, highly recommend polypropylene for one mask layer as it's good at filtering and highly breathable. I thought I had sheets of it in the form of a tub of disinfecting wipes (ironically) but while they're clearly a non-woven synthetic material, breathability is so poor the stuff is clearly unusable.

Does anyone have a good source?

<ETA> Ooh! Dettol wipes! How about those? I found a pack of Dettol antibac surface wipes that dried out because the sticky label wasn't put back properly. That stuff is really breathable. Is that the right kind of thing though? (I guess I'd need a packet of the floor wipes to get big enough sheets; these are only about 6" square.)