GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

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Martin Y
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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Martin Y » Fri Jul 03, 2020 3:03 pm

More about this magical polypropylene filter material: I gather the stuff they suggest is "interfacing material" which as a non-clothes-making person I never heard of, but seems to be a non-woven reinforcing layer either stitched in or ironed on to keep delicate fabrics in shape.

Okay well I've looked for that and the local haberdasher will sell several types but further digging suggests they're all polyamide or polyester blends and not polypropylene. Is that significant? Various docs about polypropylene aircon filters hint that its electrostatic charge is important to its function. So does the particular synthetic material make a big difference or not? I can't tell. Very tiresome.

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Tessa K
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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Tessa K » Sat Jul 04, 2020 7:35 am

Martin Y wrote:
Fri Jul 03, 2020 3:03 pm
More about this magical polypropylene filter material: I gather the stuff they suggest is "interfacing material" which as a non-clothes-making person I never heard of, but seems to be a non-woven reinforcing layer either stitched in or ironed on to keep delicate fabrics in shape.

Okay well I've looked for that and the local haberdasher will sell several types but further digging suggests they're all polyamide or polyester blends and not polypropylene. Is that significant? Various docs about polypropylene aircon filters hint that its electrostatic charge is important to its function. So does the particular synthetic material make a big difference or not? I can't tell. Very tiresome.
If you do get interfacing check what kind it is. Some of it is impregnated with stiffener that's activated when you iron the fabric and is very sticky. It can also go a bit lumpy when washed if it's not then ironed.

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Martin Y
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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Martin Y » Sat Jul 04, 2020 10:11 am

Thanks. I had guessed that all the iron-on types just partially melted and fused rather than containing a separate adhesive (or stiffener, as you describe), so that's definitely worth knowing as it's bound to affect breathability. I'm going on a mission to Needlecraft.

This has already provoked an "oh, while you're there..." response. Something about knitting needles. How many knitting needles is it possible to need? (I do realise this is analogous to asking how many spanners it's possible to need, so am in no position to object.)

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Squeak » Sat Jul 04, 2020 10:26 am

Martin Y wrote:
Sat Jul 04, 2020 10:11 am

This has already provoked an "oh, while you're there..." response. Something about knitting needles. How many knitting needles is it possible to need? (I do realise this is analogous to asking how many spanners it's possible to need, so am in no position to object.)
Correct. I bought so many of our favourite crochet hooks last time I was in a US craft store that they thought I was some kind of craft teacher. And we can still never find a 4.5mm one when we need it.

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Tessa K
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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Tessa K » Sat Jul 04, 2020 12:12 pm

Martin Y wrote:
Sat Jul 04, 2020 10:11 am
Thanks. I had guessed that all the iron-on types just partially melted and fused rather than containing a separate adhesive (or stiffener, as you describe), so that's definitely worth knowing as it's bound to affect breathability. I'm going on a mission to Needlecraft.

This has already provoked an "oh, while you're there..." response. Something about knitting needles. How many knitting needles is it possible to need? (I do realise this is analogous to asking how many spanners it's possible to need, so am in no position to object.)
Not only do you need different size needles but different length straight ones and circular ones. And some afficionados will use needles made of different materials depending on the yarn. Never question someone with a knitting needle in their hand... :D

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Martin Y
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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Martin Y » Sat Jul 04, 2020 1:46 pm

Carefully primed, I selected 7mm x 30cm needles. Mrs haberdasher was intrigued by the suggestion of interfacing as a middle layer in a mask as she hadn't heard of it, which surprised me and rather scuppered my plan to ask her advice, but as it 'appened someone had bought some just this morning for the purpose so I said I'll have what she's having, so to speak.

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Tessa K
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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Tessa K » Sat Jul 04, 2020 3:45 pm

Martin Y wrote:
Sat Jul 04, 2020 1:46 pm
Carefully primed, I selected 7mm x 30cm needles. Mrs haberdasher was intrigued by the suggestion of interfacing as a middle layer in a mask as she hadn't heard of it, which surprised me and rather scuppered my plan to ask her advice, but as it 'appened someone had bought some just this morning for the purpose so I said I'll have what she's having, so to speak.
7mm needles? That must be some fairly chunky yarn. Please let me know how you get on with the interfacing.

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Tessa K » Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:08 pm

I've made some masks with pleated sides as that was the easiest style to copy and now I'm looking at the ones with shaped seams down the middle. If you've worn both styles, is one preferable in terms of comfort, breathability etc?

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Stephanie » Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:53 pm

Following a suggestion from jimbob, I've stickied this thread to the top of the Pandemic Area, so folk can find it more easily
"I got a flu virus named after me 'cause I kissed a bat on a dare."

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Cardinal Fang
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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Cardinal Fang » Tue Jul 14, 2020 5:50 pm

Tessa K wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:08 pm
I've made some masks with pleated sides as that was the easiest style to copy and now I'm looking at the ones with shaped seams down the middle. If you've worn both styles, is one preferable in terms of comfort, breathability etc?
I personally prefer the shaped ones with the seam down the middle. I find the pleated ones seem to ride up my face and get into my eyes. The shaped ones don't

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Cardinal Fang
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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Cardinal Fang » Tue Jul 14, 2020 5:53 pm

I suspect though the real decision is whether to have elastic loops behind the ears, or ties/ elastic that goes over the head?

A few people I know who wear glasses prefer ties. My favourite (ish)* mask has 2 long loops of elastic so one can go round the back of my neck, and the other round the top, with toggles to tighten it.

CF

*My other favourite mask has dinosaurs on it, but the elastic ear loops are too tight
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Martin Y
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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Martin Y » Tue Jul 14, 2020 6:35 pm

Tessa K wrote:
Sat Jul 04, 2020 3:45 pm
... Please let me know how you get on with the interfacing.
Mrs Y reports that the interfacing (light grade, iron-on style) worked really well.

She bonded it behind the front layer when making a pair of masks in pleated style. Stitching through all the layers in the pleat plus an accent piece at the sides was laborious work for the machine but taking it slow and easy worked fine.

She made them to have round-the-ear elastic but actually left four individual elastic straps in the corners so the recipients could tie them to size. These are for her brother and his partner. Bro in particular is suffering pretty serious anxiety issues over ever going out at all so hopefully these will help.

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Bird on a Fire » Tue Jul 14, 2020 9:53 pm

Re: elastic loops vs. ties

In our experience (wearing masks regularly since March), the elastic loops are perfectly comfortable if they're just the right size (e.g. if they can be made to measure for the specific user, and members of the same household can all have different designs so they can easily tell which is theirs).

Mrs BoaF has reconfigured hers to use a couple of old shoelaces to tie round the neck/head and much prefers it, as the "women's size" mask she bought had really short loops which made it super uncomfortable.

Despite being black fabric with black straps it doesn't look that much like a gimp mask.
Born at 356.32 ppm CO2

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Tessa K
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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Tessa K » Wed Jul 15, 2020 7:36 am

Bird on a Fire wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 9:53 pm
Re: elastic loops vs. ties

In our experience (wearing masks regularly since March), the elastic loops are perfectly comfortable if they're just the right size (e.g. if they can be made to measure for the specific user, and members of the same household can all have different designs so they can easily tell which is theirs).

Mrs BoaF has reconfigured hers to use a couple of old shoelaces to tie round the neck/head and much prefers it, as the "women's size" mask she bought had really short loops which made it super uncomfortable.

Despite being black fabric with black straps it doesn't look that much like a gimp mask.
I've found making my own that elastic is fine as you can customize the length and it doesn't interfere with wearing sunglasses. I've also made the pleat sided ones a bit deeper so they come down just over the chin which prevents riding up.

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by raven » Wed Jul 15, 2020 2:07 pm

Tessa K wrote:
Tue Jul 14, 2020 12:08 pm
I've made some masks with pleated sides as that was the easiest style to copy and now I'm looking at the ones with shaped seams down the middle. If you've worn both styles, is one preferable in terms of comfort, breathability etc?
So. I've dragged the sew machine out of its dusty corner, and I've been looking at designs, debating whether to go simple or complicated, with/without a metal strip,with/without some sort of opening to insert filters, etc. (Don't think I can get hold of polypropelene easily, but I've seen coffee filters suggested & we have those...)

The gov.uk page links to this site which has two simple-ish patterns, one simple square, one with the seam down the middle:https://www.bigcommunitysew.co.uk/

But it also links to this guidance - which is aimed at people selling masks I think:https://brc.org.uk/media/674992/face-co ... nes_v2.pdf

Lots of safety points in there, but relevantly:
Face coverings should not contain seams in the mouth or nose area but where such seams are included then they shall meet the requirements for water penetration resistance
Which suggests perhaps seams up the middle aren't such a great idea unless sealed in some way.

And also for kid's masks:
c) The use of elastic ear cords is not recommended nor is the use of ties in face coverings intended to be worn by children under the age of 7 year
d)The use of face coverings with a nose bridge is not recommended for face coverings intended for use by children.
Which seem confusing but I assume are meant to limit strangling and choking hazards respectively....

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Tessa K » Wed Jul 15, 2020 4:05 pm

I've now embroidered a couple of small designs on squares of fabric and sewn them onto the mask. In addition to entertaining me, this increases the thickness in the central part of the mask. So far I've done a bat and a lizard.

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by stańczyk » Wed Jul 15, 2020 4:25 pm

Tessa K wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 4:05 pm
I've now embroidered a couple of small designs on squares of fabric and sewn them onto the mask. In addition to entertaining me, this increases the thickness in the central part of the mask. So far I've done a bat and a lizard.
A bat seems appropriate. Maybe you could also embroider a pangolin.

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by raven » Wed Jul 15, 2020 8:23 pm

Tessa K wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 4:05 pm
So far I've done a bat and a lizard.
:D

The material I just used to make my first mask has lizards on it.

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by jimbob » Wed Jul 15, 2020 8:38 pm

raven wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 8:23 pm
Tessa K wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 4:05 pm
So far I've done a bat and a lizard.
:D

The material I just used to make my first mask has lizards on it.
Any corvids?
Have you considered stupidity as an explanation

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by raven » Wed Jul 15, 2020 9:00 pm

jimbob wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 8:38 pm
Any corvids?
No, sadly.

I'm cannabalising what fabric I had in the house, which means I only have lizards or tigers. Because that's what the kids were into.
Lizard one looks pretty good, but as the fabric was originally bought for curtains it might be a bit too thick. Have to trial it tomorrow, see how hot it gets/if I can breathe in it.

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Tessa K » Thu Jul 16, 2020 11:51 am

jimbob wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 8:38 pm
raven wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 8:23 pm
Tessa K wrote:
Wed Jul 15, 2020 4:05 pm
So far I've done a bat and a lizard.
:D

The material I just used to make my first mask has lizards on it.
Any corvids?
No, but I did make this as a card for a friend. It's a detail from a Heironymous Bosch painting. It's about three inches high.
corvid 19 smaller.JPG
corvid 19 smaller.JPG (370.5 KiB) Viewed 174 times

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by jimbob » Thu Jul 16, 2020 12:28 pm

Is "nice" the appropriate response to that?

Never sure that's what I associate with Heironymous Bosch
Have you considered stupidity as an explanation

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by jimbob » Thu Jul 16, 2020 12:29 pm

That's an ace card idea
Have you considered stupidity as an explanation

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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Tessa K » Wed Jul 22, 2020 8:19 am

Worried about how you'll smoke while wearing a mask? Never fear, they solved that problem back in 1919 during the flu pandemic. It also works for a drinking straw.

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Martin Y
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Re: GUIDE: Basic Home Mask Production

Post by Martin Y » Wed Jul 22, 2020 9:17 am

Tessa K wrote:
Wed Jul 22, 2020 8:19 am
Worried about how you'll smoke while wearing a mask? Never fear, they solved that problem back in 1919 during the flu pandemic. It also works for a drinking straw.

Image
The flu viruses can still get to you, but only if they survive the Trial By Fire.

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