Back to school

Covid-19 discussion, bring your own statistics
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shpalman
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Back to school

Post by shpalman » Wed Aug 26, 2020 2:46 pm

Safe socially-distanced classroom

Until the camera angle changes right at the end...
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Re: Back to school

Post by TheScientificHippy » Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:01 pm

Also, I thought shouting and talking emphatically were frowned upon indoors. He is very close to the front row and no doubt some droplets or other will have landed from him on them.

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Re: Back to school

Post by Bird on a Fire » Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:15 pm

I'm a bit out-of-touch with the evidence base on schools.

Has anywhere with community transmission roughly comparable to the UK kept schools open without disastrous outbreaks? I'm aware that the US has been having problems, and that most countries included schools in their lockdown.

I can't think of any reason, in terms of virus transmission, why schools should be different to other indoor activities like cinemas, restaurants or gyms (especially as students eat and exercise at school), and older kids at least can get it and pass it on to their families.
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Re: Back to school

Post by shpalman » Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:19 pm

Whitty has certainly been insisting that it's safe to open schools because children aren't at risk from covid, somehow forgetting they go home at the end of each day.
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Re: Back to school

Post by Bird on a Fire » Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:42 pm

Yet another problem stemming from the overrepresentation of boarding-school kids in government.
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Re: Back to school

Post by JQH » Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:58 pm

shpalman wrote:
Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:19 pm
Whitty has certainly been insisting that it's safe to open schools because children aren't at risk from covid, somehow forgetting they go home at the end of each day.
Conveniently it would now appear that children don't transmit covid.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 100934.htm
And remember that if you botch the exit, the carnival of reaction may be coming to a town near you.

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Re: Back to school

Post by mediocrity511 » Wed Aug 26, 2020 6:38 pm

Bird on a Fire wrote:
Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:15 pm
I'm a bit out-of-touch with the evidence base on schools.

Has anywhere with community transmission roughly comparable to the UK kept schools open without disastrous outbreaks? I'm aware that the US has been having problems, and that most countries included schools in their lockdown.

I can't think of any reason, in terms of virus transmission, why schools should be different to other indoor activities like cinemas, restaurants or gyms (especially as students eat and exercise at school), and older kids at least can get it and pass it on to their families.
I think unfortunately Israel is probably the most comparable case study. Although they at least started off with masks until a heat wave struck. I do also think they closed schools and then reopened them.

Sweden did keep schools open throughout, but not for the oldest pupils and they did have social distancing. They did also have outbreaks and teachers died but they also made a very deliberate choice not to properly study transmission in schools. Which is unfortunate, as their data would have been very useful.

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Re: Back to school

Post by EACLucifer » Thu Aug 27, 2020 1:06 pm

mediocrity511 wrote:
Wed Aug 26, 2020 6:38 pm
Bird on a Fire wrote:
Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:15 pm
I'm a bit out-of-touch with the evidence base on schools.

Has anywhere with community transmission roughly comparable to the UK kept schools open without disastrous outbreaks? I'm aware that the US has been having problems, and that most countries included schools in their lockdown.

I can't think of any reason, in terms of virus transmission, why schools should be different to other indoor activities like cinemas, restaurants or gyms (especially as students eat and exercise at school), and older kids at least can get it and pass it on to their families.
I think unfortunately Israel is probably the most comparable case study. Although they at least started off with masks until a heat wave struck. I do also think they closed schools and then reopened them.
Yep. And of course, transmission via schools does not just include pupil to pupil transmission. Parents meeting each other at the school gate, etc, also a factor. As far as I can tell, evidence from Israel - which had initially done a good job of getting it under control before schools and other re-opening blew it up again - and the states is that schools are pretty damn dangerous. And from a perspective of trying to limit spread by breaking society up into little groups with limited opportunities to spread it between them, schools are a nightmare, as they link social groups that would otherwise have no link.

Unfortunately, the government is very prone to saying stuff doesn't happen because they haven't seen it, having spent no effort whatsoever looking for it, and ignoring those countries that have both looked for and seen it.

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Re: Back to school

Post by AMS » Thu Aug 27, 2020 4:44 pm

We got the first info on how our kids' school is planning it. (It's a separate infants/juniors, so years 3-6 only.) It's all very complicated with staggered start and end times, with the aim to keep class bubbles. But I have massive doubts about whether this can work, because all these bubbles are linked by siblings in different classes within the school and in the separate infants school and the local secondary.

I do actually trust the staff at the school to do as much as they can, but fundamentally, schools mix people from different households for prolonged periods indoors. I heard someone on the radio earlier say that part of the reason flu is seasonal may be the lack of school-based transmission over the summer.

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Re: Back to school

Post by mediocrity511 » Thu Aug 27, 2020 4:56 pm

Bubbles are more about test and trace rather than anything else aren't they? Limiting children to bubbles of 30 (or 300 within a secondary school!) with no social distancing doesn't itself reduce transmission, but it does make it simpler to track close contacts and hopefully outbreaks.

I mean, I'm personally expecting it to be a shitshow and we have drawn up our own plan for when we will pull miniocrity out. Mr mediocrity has a shielding list condition, we don't feel measures are adequate for if community transmission rises locally.

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Re: Back to school

Post by AMS » Thu Aug 27, 2020 5:05 pm

That's a good point, and I guess it's why they're doing it.

The thing on the radio (was when I was driving home, can't remember the interviewee, but it was the show Adam Rutherford hosts) did also suggest it might be a good idea for secondary schools to consider keeping class bubbles, rather than mixing around for different subjects (or thinking about it, different abilities, which brings it's own issues for the teaching).

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Re: Back to school

Post by lpm » Thu Aug 27, 2020 5:08 pm

JQH wrote:
Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:58 pm
shpalman wrote:
Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:19 pm
Whitty has certainly been insisting that it's safe to open schools because children aren't at risk from covid, somehow forgetting they go home at the end of each day.
Conveniently it would now appear that children don't transmit covid.

https://www.sciencedaily.com/releases/2 ... 100934.htm
That's a month and a half out of date. An eternity in the pandemic era.
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Re: Back to school

Post by lpm » Thu Aug 27, 2020 5:14 pm

EACLucifer wrote:
Thu Aug 27, 2020 1:06 pm
mediocrity511 wrote:
Wed Aug 26, 2020 6:38 pm
Bird on a Fire wrote:
Wed Aug 26, 2020 3:15 pm
I'm a bit out-of-touch with the evidence base on schools.

Has anywhere with community transmission roughly comparable to the UK kept schools open without disastrous outbreaks? I'm aware that the US has been having problems, and that most countries included schools in their lockdown.

I can't think of any reason, in terms of virus transmission, why schools should be different to other indoor activities like cinemas, restaurants or gyms (especially as students eat and exercise at school), and older kids at least can get it and pass it on to their families.
I think unfortunately Israel is probably the most comparable case study. Although they at least started off with masks until a heat wave struck. I do also think they closed schools and then reopened them.
Yep. And of course, transmission via schools does not just include pupil to pupil transmission. Parents meeting each other at the school gate, etc, also a factor. As far as I can tell, evidence from Israel - which had initially done a good job of getting it under control before schools and other re-opening blew it up again - and the states is that schools are pretty damn dangerous. And from a perspective of trying to limit spread by breaking society up into little groups with limited opportunities to spread it between them, schools are a nightmare, as they link social groups that would otherwise have no link.

Unfortunately, the government is very prone to saying stuff doesn't happen because they haven't seen it, having spent no effort whatsoever looking for it, and ignoring those countries that have both looked for and seen it.
Yes, I suspect education is the most costly thing out there, more costly than indoor nightlife.

But we have to think of welfare and the economy. Closed schools are also the most costly thing in terms of economic damage. They have to be reopened. Indoor nightlife gives almost zero economic benefit, on the other hand. Shut it down and the 20-29 year olds epidemic should slow, to compensate for the coming 10-19 upswing.
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Re: Back to school

Post by Sciolus » Thu Aug 27, 2020 6:19 pm

Yeah, my hunch is that schools and pubs/cafes/restaurants are about equally risky, each adding around 0.2 to R, but the socioeconomic benefits of opening schools is decidedly greater.

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Re: Back to school

Post by mediocrity511 » Thu Aug 27, 2020 7:02 pm

The thing is, there's so many other ways that schools could return that would be safer than what they are doing. And aside from a bit for school transport (announced mid holiday, so no time for councils to sort it) and schools being able to claim for extra money if they have an outbreak, no money has been put towards facilitating a safe return to school.

Other places have hired extra teachers and used community venues to enable smaller classes. Other places have done part time "blended learning", other places have gone fully online. In the UK, we aren't even funding extra cleaners!

There's been very little thought about what children need, what families need, what school staff need and what employers of parents need and how best to meet those needs and what should be prioritised.

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Re: Back to school

Post by jimbob » Thu Aug 27, 2020 7:04 pm

AMS wrote:
Thu Aug 27, 2020 4:44 pm
We got the first info on how our kids' school is planning it. (It's a separate infants/juniors, so years 3-6 only.) It's all very complicated with staggered start and end times, with the aim to keep class bubbles. But I have massive doubts about whether this can work, because all these bubbles are linked by siblings in different classes within the school and in the separate infants school and the local secondary.

I do actually trust the staff at the school to do as much as they can, but fundamentally, schools mix people from different households for prolonged periods indoors. I heard someone on the radio earlier say that part of the reason flu is seasonal may be the lack of school-based transmission over the summer.
Siblings are the issue. You have multiple primary schools each feeding several secondary schools, and secondary schools frrding colleges in different towns. For example my kids' old secondary school feeds schools in both Sheffield and Greater Manchester.

Basically, the education system is a network that spans England (and presumably similarly for Scotland, Wales and Northern Ireland) including a significant proportion who don't understand about the hygiene requirements
Have you considered stupidity as an explanation

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Re: Back to school

Post by bagpuss » Fri Aug 28, 2020 9:45 am

We've had no communication yet from the bagkitten's school since mid-July.

So far, all I know is that they plan to:

Stagger start/finish times but only by 10 minutes and with 2 groups of half the school each - which is frankly pointless as it's impossible to plan your arrival down to the minute, especially when getting small kids out of the door is involved. And even if you could, it takes at least 3 or 4 minutes to get in and out of the bottleneck that is the school site (one way in and out, 3 schools, 2 pre-schools, one nursery, all on the same site with a single entrance from the road) so you're going to get people going out at the same time as others are going in and it's all going to be one big crowded mess anyway. Even without that, half the school is 6 classes, so 180 kids. And of course plenty of parents will have kids in both halves of the school so will have to hang around for both drop offs anyway. And some will have kids in both infant and junior schools so they'll have to span those staggered starts too...

Re-arrange classrooms so that the kids are all facing the front, rather than being at grouped tables.

Eat lunch in their classrooms so no hot meals. Packed lunches provided for free school meal kids, the rest of us have to send them in.

Kids will each be given their own allocated equipment (pens, pencils, etc) which will not be shared.

Plus year group "bubbles" (so, yeah, ~90 kids, that's not what I call a bubble, especially as between them they'll have siblings in every other "bubble" plus every other local school plus parents working in most of the local high risk locations - hospitals, health centres, etc); 2m distancing (good luck enforcing that - I gave up trying to enforce it with the bagkitten playing with the next door neighbour - each reminder is good for about 30 seconds); extra cleaning; yada yada yada.


Don't get me wrong, I don't see that there's much else they can do with zero help from the government and no money to spend on spreading out across other venues (if enough venues could even be found - there's not a lot of choices where I live). And the kids need to go back to school. But it really doesn't feel like there's been any proper planning or advice or research from government to make this happen as safely as possible. They really just seem to be relying on the "kids won't spread it much" theory with a side helping of lots of crossed fingers. I'm suddenly very much feeling my age and my status as a no-longer-protected-by-oestrogen overweight 50 year old woman. Hopefully my longer runs of late will have improved my fitness enough to help a bit. And Mr Bagpuss, though not overweight, is a not-very-fit 50 year old man. So we could be a bit stuffed.

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Re: Back to school

Post by JQH » Fri Aug 28, 2020 10:49 am

bagpuss wrote:
Fri Aug 28, 2020 9:45 am
...
Kids will each be given their own allocated equipment (pens, pencils, etc) which will not be shared.
...
I hope the school has a plentiful supply to replace lost items.
And remember that if you botch the exit, the carnival of reaction may be coming to a town near you.

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Re: Back to school

Post by bagpuss » Fri Aug 28, 2020 10:54 am

JQH wrote:
Fri Aug 28, 2020 10:49 am
bagpuss wrote:
Fri Aug 28, 2020 9:45 am
...
Kids will each be given their own allocated equipment (pens, pencils, etc) which will not be shared.
...
I hope the school has a plentiful supply to replace lost items.
I can just see that by half way through week 3 they'll be forced to focus on monochromatic art.

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Re: Back to school

Post by mediocrity511 » Fri Aug 28, 2020 12:32 pm

bagpuss wrote:
Fri Aug 28, 2020 9:45 am
We've had no communication yet from the bagkitten's school since mid-July.

So far, all I know is that they plan to:

Stagger start/finish times but only by 10 minutes and with 2 groups of half the school each - which is frankly pointless as it's impossible to plan your arrival down to the minute, especially when getting small kids out of the door is involved. And even if you could, it takes at least 3 or 4 minutes to get in and out of the bottleneck that is the school site (one way in and out, 3 schools, 2 pre-schools, one nursery, all on the same site with a single entrance from the road) so you're going to get people going out at the same time as others are going in and it's all going to be one big crowded mess anyway. Even without that, half the school is 6 classes, so 180 kids. And of course plenty of parents will have kids in both halves of the school so will have to hang around for both drop offs anyway. And some will have kids in both infant and junior schools so they'll have to span those staggered starts too...

Re-arrange classrooms so that the kids are all facing the front, rather than being at grouped tables.

Eat lunch in their classrooms so no hot meals. Packed lunches provided for free school meal kids, the rest of us have to send them in.

Kids will each be given their own allocated equipment (pens, pencils, etc) which will not be shared.

Plus year group "bubbles" (so, yeah, ~90 kids, that's not what I call a bubble, especially as between them they'll have siblings in every other "bubble" plus every other local school plus parents working in most of the local high risk locations - hospitals, health centres, etc); 2m distancing (good luck enforcing that - I gave up trying to enforce it with the bagkitten playing with the next door neighbour - each reminder is good for about 30 seconds); extra cleaning; yada yada yada.


Don't get me wrong, I don't see that there's much else they can do with zero help from the government and no money to spend on spreading out across other venues (if enough venues could even be found - there's not a lot of choices where I live). And the kids need to go back to school. But it really doesn't feel like there's been any proper planning or advice or research from government to make this happen as safely as possible. They really just seem to be relying on the "kids won't spread it much" theory with a side helping of lots of crossed fingers. I'm suddenly very much feeling my age and my status as a no-longer-protected-by-oestrogen overweight 50 year old woman. Hopefully my longer runs of late will have improved my fitness enough to help a bit. And Mr Bagpuss, though not overweight, is a not-very-fit 50 year old man. So we could be a bit stuffed.
How big are their classrooms for them to even attempt 2m distancing?! Most classrooms can't even allow for 1m between kids.

Ours is similar, but no distancing, basically just attempting to get the kids not to touch each other. And she needs a fresh set of uniform every day.

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Re: Back to school

Post by bagpuss » Fri Aug 28, 2020 12:59 pm

mediocrity511 wrote:
Fri Aug 28, 2020 12:32 pm
bagpuss wrote:
Fri Aug 28, 2020 9:45 am
We've had no communication yet from the bagkitten's school since mid-July.

So far, all I know is that they plan to:

Stagger start/finish times but only by 10 minutes and with 2 groups of half the school each - which is frankly pointless as it's impossible to plan your arrival down to the minute, especially when getting small kids out of the door is involved. And even if you could, it takes at least 3 or 4 minutes to get in and out of the bottleneck that is the school site (one way in and out, 3 schools, 2 pre-schools, one nursery, all on the same site with a single entrance from the road) so you're going to get people going out at the same time as others are going in and it's all going to be one big crowded mess anyway. Even without that, half the school is 6 classes, so 180 kids. And of course plenty of parents will have kids in both halves of the school so will have to hang around for both drop offs anyway. And some will have kids in both infant and junior schools so they'll have to span those staggered starts too...

Re-arrange classrooms so that the kids are all facing the front, rather than being at grouped tables.

Eat lunch in their classrooms so no hot meals. Packed lunches provided for free school meal kids, the rest of us have to send them in.

Kids will each be given their own allocated equipment (pens, pencils, etc) which will not be shared.

Plus year group "bubbles" (so, yeah, ~90 kids, that's not what I call a bubble, especially as between them they'll have siblings in every other "bubble" plus every other local school plus parents working in most of the local high risk locations - hospitals, health centres, etc); 2m distancing (good luck enforcing that - I gave up trying to enforce it with the bagkitten playing with the next door neighbour - each reminder is good for about 30 seconds); extra cleaning; yada yada yada.


Don't get me wrong, I don't see that there's much else they can do with zero help from the government and no money to spend on spreading out across other venues (if enough venues could even be found - there's not a lot of choices where I live). And the kids need to go back to school. But it really doesn't feel like there's been any proper planning or advice or research from government to make this happen as safely as possible. They really just seem to be relying on the "kids won't spread it much" theory with a side helping of lots of crossed fingers. I'm suddenly very much feeling my age and my status as a no-longer-protected-by-oestrogen overweight 50 year old woman. Hopefully my longer runs of late will have improved my fitness enough to help a bit. And Mr Bagpuss, though not overweight, is a not-very-fit 50 year old man. So we could be a bit stuffed.
How big are their classrooms for them to even attempt 2m distancing?! Most classrooms can't even allow for 1m between kids.

Ours is similar, but no distancing, basically just attempting to get the kids not to touch each other. And she needs a fresh set of uniform every day.
Not sure about the Y5 classrooms but they'd certainly have struggled in either of the classrooms the bagkitten has been in in the last 2 years. Just re-read it all again and they're talking about working together in pairs rather than in groups so I'm assuming that when they talk about 2m distancing they don't mean in the actual classrooms but when walking around the school, etc.

Edit: I'm hoping that the bagkitten is paired with her best friend because she's also an only child and we know their family and know they've been really careful all the way through.

Edit again: Fresh set of uniform every day is going to be hard for some families, I would think? Either have to spend a lot more or be constantly washing. We've always done that anyway, except cardigans, as the bagkitten is a very messy eater so it's easiest just to assume that she'll need clean uniform every day and buy enough for that, with a big wash every week. :lol:

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Re: Back to school

Post by mediocrity511 » Fri Aug 28, 2020 1:33 pm

bagpuss wrote:
Fri Aug 28, 2020 12:59 pm
mediocrity511 wrote:
Fri Aug 28, 2020 12:32 pm
bagpuss wrote:
Fri Aug 28, 2020 9:45 am
We've had no communication yet from the bagkitten's school since mid-July.

So far, all I know is that they plan to:

Stagger start/finish times but only by 10 minutes and with 2 groups of half the school each - which is frankly pointless as it's impossible to plan your arrival down to the minute, especially when getting small kids out of the door is involved. And even if you could, it takes at least 3 or 4 minutes to get in and out of the bottleneck that is the school site (one way in and out, 3 schools, 2 pre-schools, one nursery, all on the same site with a single entrance from the road) so you're going to get people going out at the same time as others are going in and it's all going to be one big crowded mess anyway. Even without that, half the school is 6 classes, so 180 kids. And of course plenty of parents will have kids in both halves of the school so will have to hang around for both drop offs anyway. And some will have kids in both infant and junior schools so they'll have to span those staggered starts too...

Re-arrange classrooms so that the kids are all facing the front, rather than being at grouped tables.

Eat lunch in their classrooms so no hot meals. Packed lunches provided for free school meal kids, the rest of us have to send them in.

Kids will each be given their own allocated equipment (pens, pencils, etc) which will not be shared.

Plus year group "bubbles" (so, yeah, ~90 kids, that's not what I call a bubble, especially as between them they'll have siblings in every other "bubble" plus every other local school plus parents working in most of the local high risk locations - hospitals, health centres, etc); 2m distancing (good luck enforcing that - I gave up trying to enforce it with the bagkitten playing with the next door neighbour - each reminder is good for about 30 seconds); extra cleaning; yada yada yada.


Don't get me wrong, I don't see that there's much else they can do with zero help from the government and no money to spend on spreading out across other venues (if enough venues could even be found - there's not a lot of choices where I live). And the kids need to go back to school. But it really doesn't feel like there's been any proper planning or advice or research from government to make this happen as safely as possible. They really just seem to be relying on the "kids won't spread it much" theory with a side helping of lots of crossed fingers. I'm suddenly very much feeling my age and my status as a no-longer-protected-by-oestrogen overweight 50 year old woman. Hopefully my longer runs of late will have improved my fitness enough to help a bit. And Mr Bagpuss, though not overweight, is a not-very-fit 50 year old man. So we could be a bit stuffed.
How big are their classrooms for them to even attempt 2m distancing?! Most classrooms can't even allow for 1m between kids.

Ours is similar, but no distancing, basically just attempting to get the kids not to touch each other. And she needs a fresh set of uniform every day.
Not sure about the Y5 classrooms but they'd certainly have struggled in either of the classrooms the bagkitten has been in in the last 2 years. Just re-read it all again and they're talking about working together in pairs rather than in groups so I'm assuming that when they talk about 2m distancing they don't mean in the actual classrooms but when walking around the school, etc.

Edit: I'm hoping that the bagkitten is paired with her best friend because she's also an only child and we know their family and know they've been really careful all the way through.

Edit again: Fresh set of uniform every day is going to be hard for some families, I would think? Either have to spend a lot more or be constantly washing. We've always done that anyway, except cardigans, as the bagkitten is a very messy eater so it's easiest just to assume that she'll need clean uniform every day and buy enough for that, with a big wash every week. :lol:
Very lax uniform policy though, so nothing needs to be logoed and basically anything goes if it's in school colours. But yeah, we've bought extra as miniocrity has a medical condition that frequently results in her needing to change at some point during the day. So realistically I'm going to be washing 1.5 sets of uniform a day, as opposed to the current 1 set.

We don't even know miniocrity's teacher yet. All we know is that they're dividing the 2 forms where one is the kids who went back before the summer and one is the kids who didn't. Unfortunately this means she won't be with the majority of her friends and her class has disproportionately more of the challenging children.

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Re: Back to school

Post by bagpuss » Fri Aug 28, 2020 1:43 pm

mediocrity511 wrote:
Fri Aug 28, 2020 1:33 pm
We don't even know miniocrity's teacher yet. All we know is that they're dividing the 2 forms where one is the kids who went back before the summer and one is the kids who didn't. Unfortunately this means she won't be with the majority of her friends and her class has disproportionately more of the challenging children.
That sounds far from ideal :(

And rubbish that you don't know who her teacher is yet. The fact that the bagkitten has got lucky again and has bagged the best teacher in the year for the 3rd year in a row, is really helping us with her anxieties about going back to school. She's still in mourning, really, for the missed term with her Y4 teacher - who was truly an excellent teacher in person but nothing special via remote learning.

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Re: Back to school

Post by mediocrity511 » Fri Aug 28, 2020 2:08 pm

bagpuss wrote:
Fri Aug 28, 2020 1:43 pm
mediocrity511 wrote:
Fri Aug 28, 2020 1:33 pm
We don't even know miniocrity's teacher yet. All we know is that they're dividing the 2 forms where one is the kids who went back before the summer and one is the kids who didn't. Unfortunately this means she won't be with the majority of her friends and her class has disproportionately more of the challenging children.
That sounds far from ideal :(

And rubbish that you don't know who her teacher is yet. The fact that the bagkitten has got lucky again and has bagged the best teacher in the year for the 3rd year in a row, is really helping us with her anxieties about going back to school. She's still in mourning, really, for the missed term with her Y4 teacher - who was truly an excellent teacher in person but nothing special via remote learning.
Yeah, I'm pretty disappointed. I know they had massive problems with families going totally off the radar and not submitting any work, so I imagine they feel that this way will allow those kids who need to catch up the opportunity to do that. However, it just doesn't apply to Miniocrity and if anything lockdown allowed us to set her more challenging work and extension tasks on what her teacher gave. For example, she wasn't engaging with the maths work set because it was too easy, so we just did the stuff set for the year above.

That said, it does mean it will likely be less of a dilemma if we decide to pull her out because cases start reaching concerning levels locally.

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mediocrity511
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Re: Back to school

Post by mediocrity511 » Fri Aug 28, 2020 7:55 pm

https://www.gov.uk/government/publicati ... strictions

So this is interesting...

Also nice of them to drop it the weekend before schools return!

But it shows some of the restrictions schools may face if everything starts going belly up. There's quite a lotmof references to how shielding will not be reintroduced and vulnerable children and those from vulnerable households are expected to attend, even when things are so bad that they are operating 2 week rotas at secondary level to allow time for peoplemto show symptoms whilst off school,

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