Immunity Debt

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lpm
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Immunity Debt

Post by lpm » Fri Jul 09, 2021 12:51 pm

Immunity debt, the new buzzwords. Because of lockdowns and social distancing, babies and toddlers have experienced fewer of the usual respiratory viruses, leading to a surge of serious cases when diseases catch up. Two year's worth of illness in a couple of months, that sort of thing.

In particular RSV, respiratory syncytial virus: "RSV is a common respiratory illness. In adults, it generally only produces very mild symptoms – but it can make young children extremely ill, or even be fatal.
New Zealand has reported nearly 1,000 RSV cases in the past five weeks, according to the Institute of Environmental Science and Research. The usual average is 1,743 over the full 29-week winter season. Australia is also experiencing a surge, with overcrowded Victoria hospitals also hit by unusually high rates of RSV...

Epidemiologist and public health professor Michael Baker used the metaphor of forest brushfires: if a year or two have passed without fire, there is more fuel on the ground to feed the flames. When a fire finally comes, it burns much more fiercely. “What we’re seeing now is we’ve accumulated a whole lot of susceptible children that have missed out on exposure – so now they’re seeing it for the first time,” Baker said.

The “immunity debt” phenomenon occurs because measures like lockdowns, hand-washing, social distancing and masks are not only effective at controlling Covid-19. They also suppress the spread of other illnesses that transmit in a similar way, including the flu, common cold, and lesser-known respiratory illnesses like RSA. In New Zealand, lockdowns last winter led to a 99.9% reduction in flu cases and a 98% reduction in RSV - and near-eliminated the spike of excess deaths New Zealand usually experiences during winter...

Usually, people experience near-universal exposure to RSV as children, Baker said, with most exposed in their first year of life...
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/ ... unity-debt
What ever happened to that Trump guy, you know, the one who was president for a bit?

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Woodchopper
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Re: Immunity Debt

Post by Woodchopper » Fri Jul 09, 2021 1:09 pm

It's also been noted in Israel:

Israel seeing spike in childhood illness RSV after it receded during COVID
Doctors speculate lockdowns kept people from contracting the virus, lowering immunity to it as the general population emerged from restrictions
https://www.timesofisrael.com/israel-sa ... ing-covid/

COVID-19 might be over, but viral infections in Israel are surging
Children and adults around the country are getting sick as it usually happens in the winter, experts say.
“We have never seen anything like this,” said Dr. Tal Brosh, head of Infectious Disease Unit at the Samson Assuta Ashdod Hospital. “We’ve been monitoring viral infections in the hospital, which of course is just the tip of the iceberg of what is going on in the community, as for each hospitalized patient, there are many more out there. Since the spring, we have been seeing an increasing number of respiratory diseases, and since May there has been a surge in RSV cases.”
RSV, or respiratory syncytial virus, usually appears in the winter together with the influenza, and is especially serious for very young children and older, vulnerable adults.
“We usually see it disappearing in the summer, but if we consider the numbers now, it looks like winter in previous years,” said Brosh. “During the winter 2020-2021, we did not see one individual case of RSV.”
RSV is not the only virus that is widely circulating – other diseases that are currently infecting a growing number of people are a type of adenovirus, the human metapneumovirus (HMPV), and the rhinovirus. All of them are associated with respiratory symptoms and other symptoms similar to those of a severe cold. At the same time, influenza has not hit the country since the winter previous to the pandemic.
https://www.jpost.com/health-science/co ... ing-671354

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shpalman
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Re: Immunity Debt

Post by shpalman » Fri Jul 09, 2021 2:18 pm

lpm wrote:
Fri Jul 09, 2021 12:51 pm
Immunity debt, the new buzzwords. Because of lockdowns and social distancing, babies and toddlers have experienced fewer of the usual respiratory viruses, leading to a surge of serious cases when diseases catch up. Two year's worth of illness in a couple of months, that sort of thing.

In particular RSV, respiratory syncytial virus: "RSV is a common respiratory illness. In adults, it generally only produces very mild symptoms – but it can make young children extremely ill, or even be fatal.
New Zealand has reported nearly 1,000 RSV cases in the past five weeks, according to the Institute of Environmental Science and Research. The usual average is 1,743 over the full 29-week winter season. Australia is also experiencing a surge, with overcrowded Victoria hospitals also hit by unusually high rates of RSV...

Epidemiologist and public health professor Michael Baker used the metaphor of forest brushfires: if a year or two have passed without fire, there is more fuel on the ground to feed the flames. When a fire finally comes, it burns much more fiercely. “What we’re seeing now is we’ve accumulated a whole lot of susceptible children that have missed out on exposure – so now they’re seeing it for the first time,” Baker said.

The “immunity debt” phenomenon occurs because measures like lockdowns, hand-washing, social distancing and masks are not only effective at controlling Covid-19. They also suppress the spread of other illnesses that transmit in a similar way, including the flu, common cold, and lesser-known respiratory illnesses like RSA. In New Zealand, lockdowns last winter led to a 99.9% reduction in flu cases and a 98% reduction in RSV - and near-eliminated the spike of excess deaths New Zealand usually experiences during winter...

Usually, people experience near-universal exposure to RSV as children, Baker said, with most exposed in their first year of life...
https://www.theguardian.com/world/2021/ ... unity-debt
Peaks like the current outbreak don’t necessarily mean the country will have more RSV cases overall, Baker says – it may just be that all the cases are grouped together, instead of spread out over several years.
Usually, people experience near-universal exposure to RSV as children, Baker said, with most exposed in their first year of life...
it can make young children extremely ill, or even be fatal.
So (a) having delayed the RSV peak doesn't necessarily mean there's more RSV and (b) RSV is worse for young children so there's no argument for letting them have had it when they were younger.
molto tricky


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