DNA Waves and Their Applications in Biology

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jimbob
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DNA Waves and Their Applications in Biology

Post by jimbob » Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:23 am

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/31850131/

Read the methods section and weep:
Abstract
Aim: In this research, we show that DNA waves have many applications in biology. DNA is formed by the joining of quantum particles like electrons and charged atoms. DNA has different motions during transcription, translation, and replication, in which the charged particles move, accelerate, and emit waves. Thus, DNA could emit quantum waves.

Methods: Two methods are proposed to observe the effect of DNA waves. The first proposed method measures DNA waves emitted by bacteria suspended in the milk. The vessel of milk is placed in the interior of an inductor. One side of the vessel is connected to a generator and another side to a scope. By sending a current to the inductor, an input electromagnetic field is produced. Bacteria interact with the input field, change it and produce new output signals. Using the scope, the output signals are observed and compared with the input signals. The number of DNA waves produced also depends on temperature.
Have you considered stupidity as an explanation

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shpalman
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Re: DNA Waves and Their Applications in Biology

Post by shpalman » Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:30 am

I read the whole thing in mocking Spongebob case:

"dna Is fORMeD BY ThE joINING oF QuAnTUM paRtiCLEs lIKE ElECTroNs and cHaRGed AToMS"

... makes a lot more sense.
stoP-THAt-RiGHT-nOW.jpg
stoP-THAt-RiGHT-nOW.jpg (92.57 KiB) Viewed 164 times
molto tricky

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shpalman
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Re: DNA Waves and Their Applications in Biology

Post by shpalman » Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:33 am

By the way, when charged particles accelerate, that makes a "quantum wave" called "light" and chemical reactions often emit that.
molto tricky

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Martin Y
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Re: DNA Waves and Their Applications in Biology

Post by Martin Y » Thu Jul 23, 2020 7:38 am

Why don't they just tap their glass of milk with a pencil and listen to how much the bacterial DNA quantum waves change the sound? That would provide a useful saving on test equipment, as the pencil could also then be used to record the results and write their prize-winning paper.

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jimbob
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Re: DNA Waves and Their Applications in Biology

Post by jimbob » Thu Jul 23, 2020 8:02 am

You might be unsurprised that the lead author has also been involved in a, for want of a better word, "paper" on the effects of 5G on coronavirus.

https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/32668870/


5G Technology and induction of coronavirus in skin cells

It seems to have a similar level of rigour.
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JQH
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Re: DNA Waves and Their Applications in Biology

Post by JQH » Thu Jul 23, 2020 3:44 pm

I thought PubMed was meant to be reputable.
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Bird on a Fire
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Re: DNA Waves and Their Applications in Biology

Post by Bird on a Fire » Thu Jul 23, 2020 4:27 pm

JQH wrote:
Thu Jul 23, 2020 3:44 pm
I thought PubMed was meant to be reputable.
It's just an indexing service for biomedical journals, so I wouldn't rely on it as anything more than a rule-of-thumb. Even top journals publish duff papers (indeed, Nature and Science are the worst offenders for non-replicable results), and it appears that in this case the Journal of Biological Regulators & Homeostatic Agents has published some very obvious b.llsh.t.

Unfortunately, given the myriad problems in scientific publishing - both writing and publishing papers are highly incentivised, whereas reviewing them isn't at all really - peer review is more of a minimum threshold than any kind of guarantee these days.

Outright fraud is rampant, publication bias means loads of stuff is kept out of the literature, etc.
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