Phrenology by another name.

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Tessa K
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Re: Phrenology by another name.

Post by Tessa K » Thu Oct 01, 2020 9:21 am

bob sterman wrote:
Wed Sep 30, 2020 6:44 pm
Tessa K wrote:
Wed Sep 30, 2020 11:39 am
And now the media has picked up on this nonsense which means it's only a matter of time before Trump starts to quote it.

https://www.thesun.co.uk/news/12796321/ ... illoughby/
Scientist Lou Safra, who worked on the project, said: “We cannot precisely say why these images appear more or less trustworthy.

"However, from studying we know that someone who has sunken cheeks, furrowed brows and eyes set close together is more likely to be perceived as an untrustworthy or dishonest person.

"And that someone with a smiling face, prominent cheekbones and high eyebrows is more likely to be perceived as a trustworthy, honest person.”
At least there the quoted scientist is making it clear that what is being discussed is perceived trustworthiness - doesn't seem to be suggesting these perceptions relate to actual trustworthiness.

When people make snap judgements about others - e.g. at first glance - trustworthiness and dominance seem to be the 2 most important dimensions that they form judgements about...

https://www.apa.org/science/about/psa/2010/03/sci-brief

Even if these judgements are not accurate surely it's worth studying them? E.g. to understand why some people can get away with all sorts of things while actually being dishonest rogues?
I thought the first snap judgement was 'do I fancy you?'

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