Unlikely uses of graphene

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Grumble
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Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by Grumble » Wed Mar 16, 2022 7:39 am

Did anyone have car wax on their card? https://www.turtlewax.co.uk/collections ... w/graphene
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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by shpalman » Wed Mar 16, 2022 7:53 am

Good to see those massless Dirac fermions being useful.
molto tricky

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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by Woodchopper » Wed Mar 16, 2022 8:27 am

Anyone mind if I move this thread to the Nerd Lab? Seems very nredlabbish to me.

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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by Grumble » Wed Mar 16, 2022 9:08 am

Woodchopper wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 8:27 am
Anyone mind if I move this thread to the Nerd Lab? Seems very nredlabbish to me.
Not at all.
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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by Woodchopper » Wed Mar 16, 2022 9:13 am

Grumble wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 9:08 am
Woodchopper wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 8:27 am
Anyone mind if I move this thread to the Nerd Lab? Seems very nredlabbish to me.
Not at all.
Cheers, done.

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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by veravista » Wed Mar 16, 2022 10:15 am

Golf balls and now golf shafts....

https://www.golfpunkhq.com/equipment/ar ... golf-ball-

hmm

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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by Grumble » Wed Mar 16, 2022 10:37 am

veravista wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 10:15 am
Golf balls and now golf shafts....

https://www.golfpunkhq.com/equipment/ar ... golf-ball-

hmm
There’s a truism in materials science that advances are led by the military and sports - because these are fields where people are prepared to spend money to gain advantage, so I’m less surprised to see graphene in a sports context.

You can get “graphene grip” running shoes as well.
https://www.inov-8.com/trailfly-g-270-m ... nning-shoe
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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by shpalman » Wed Mar 16, 2022 11:21 am

Grumble wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 10:37 am
veravista wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 10:15 am
Golf balls and now golf shafts....

https://www.golfpunkhq.com/equipment/ar ... golf-ball-

hmm
There’s a truism in materials science that advances are led by the military and sports - because these are fields where people are prepared to spend money to gain advantage, so I’m less surprised to see graphene in a sports context.

You can get “graphene grip” running shoes as well.
https://www.inov-8.com/trailfly-g-270-m ... nning-shoe
It's been in skis and tennis rackets for a while now.

Sports people also do all sorts of superstitious and pseudoscientific b.llsh.t because they feel like they gain an advantage from doing so, but I'm totally sure graphene has been scientifically demonstrated to give an advantage and isn't just leveraging some fashionable science to make more money off of people.
molto tricky

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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by Grumble » Wed Mar 16, 2022 11:25 am

shpalman wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 11:21 am
Grumble wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 10:37 am
veravista wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 10:15 am
Golf balls and now golf shafts....

https://www.golfpunkhq.com/equipment/ar ... golf-ball-

hmm
There’s a truism in materials science that advances are led by the military and sports - because these are fields where people are prepared to spend money to gain advantage, so I’m less surprised to see graphene in a sports context.

You can get “graphene grip” running shoes as well.
https://www.inov-8.com/trailfly-g-270-m ... nning-shoe
It's been in skis and tennis rackets for a while now.

Sports people also do all sorts of superstitious and pseudoscientific b.llsh.t because they feel like they gain an advantage from doing so, but I'm totally sure graphene has been scientifically demonstrated to give an advantage and isn't just leveraging some fashionable science to make more money off of people.
There’s a lack of standardised testing that would demonstrate a clear advantage. I can imagine lots of tests that could be done, but I don’t think manufacturers are keen on cross-brand comparisons, and certainly wouldn’t pay for them. It’s only when safety is involved (E.g. helmets) that standard tests get used.

Are there any graphene helmets? I’ll just go off and research.
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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by WFJ » Wed Mar 16, 2022 11:29 am

shpalman wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 11:21 am
Grumble wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 10:37 am
veravista wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 10:15 am
Golf balls and now golf shafts....

https://www.golfpunkhq.com/equipment/ar ... golf-ball-

hmm
There’s a truism in materials science that advances are led by the military and sports - because these are fields where people are prepared to spend money to gain advantage, so I’m less surprised to see graphene in a sports context.

You can get “graphene grip” running shoes as well.
https://www.inov-8.com/trailfly-g-270-m ... nning-shoe
It's been in skis and tennis rackets for a while now.

Sports people also do all sorts of superstitious and pseudoscientific b.llsh.t because they feel like they gain an advantage from doing so, but I'm totally sure graphene has been scientifically demonstrated to give an advantage and isn't just leveraging some fashionable science to make more money off of people.
When does graphene become graphite? I'm not sure I would want to use skis that are a single atom thick.

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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by shpalman » Wed Mar 16, 2022 11:38 am

Well, the "graphene" in this case is probably small flakes of thin (one-to-few monolayer) graphite mixed in with whatever the rest of the material is.

The Cosmic Collection introduces a new direct-ion for Graphene Plus.
molto tricky

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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by IvanV » Wed Mar 16, 2022 1:54 pm

various people wrote: Golf balls and now golf shafts....

https://www.golfpunkhq.com/equipment/ar ... golf-ball-

You can get “graphene grip” running shoes as well.
https://www.inov-8.com/trailfly-g-270-m ... nning-shoe

It's been in skis and tennis rackets for a while now.

There’s a lack of standardised testing that would demonstrate a clear advantage. I can imagine lots of tests that could be done, but I don’t think manufacturers are keen on cross-brand comparisons, and certainly wouldn’t pay for them. It’s only when safety is involved (E.g. helmets) that standard tests get used.
One area where there is standardised testing is golf balls. Precisely to try and prevent an arms race in golf balls, there are regulations for golf balls based on standardised testing. When struck by standard test apparatus, a permitted golf ball must depart by no more than a specified maximum speed, and travel no further in total than a standard maximum distance, presumably based also on some standardised terrain.

They are saying these golf balls go further. It is, today, not difficult to make a golf ball which goes further than is permitted, indeed much further. So what can they mean? Maybe they can go further for non-standard whacks, while meeting the test for standard whacks. Or else have some real world advantage not assessed in the standardised test, which means that they go further in certain "real world" conditions.

Manufactured objects tend to have some variability in practice. My understanding is that cheap golf balls are ones with average parameters such that the manufacturer can be reasonably sure the entire batch passes the standard based on some limited random testing. Whereas more expensive golf balls are made with average parameters closer to the limits of acceptability, then individually tested, and priced according to their actual individual parameters, with the cost that a proportion are discarded as being out of gauge. Or sold on the black market...

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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by veravista » Wed Mar 16, 2022 2:21 pm

Beware the rules of Golf. A conforming ball can't exceed certain parameters when hit with the standard test kit. Unfortunately, some pro players can now hit balls at speeds well in excess of this and if the CoR is tailored to match these higher impact speeds then it will go further. Doesn't help poor saps like me though, but the graphene balls were quite popular a couple of years ago until they were superseded by new longer straighter etc versions.

Veravistina did lots of work on composite materials at Uni, and the adage was that a new material was first shown to aerospace and F1, if they weren't interested it went to cycling and if all else fails there was always a ready market in golf..

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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by WFJ » Wed Mar 16, 2022 5:02 pm

shpalman wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 11:38 am
Well, the "graphene" in this case is probably small flakes of thin (one-to-few monolayer) graphite mixed in with whatever the rest of the material is.

The Cosmic Collection introduces a new direct-ion for Graphene Plus.
I'm totally ignorant of graphene and material science, but why is graphene better than graphite for reinforcing polymers? I don't understand the structural benefits of the graphene being super thin. Is it just that you get more 'pieces' of graphene per mass of carbon?

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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by shpalman » Wed Mar 16, 2022 5:24 pm

WFJ wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 5:02 pm
shpalman wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 11:38 am
Well, the "graphene" in this case is probably small flakes of thin (one-to-few monolayer) graphite mixed in with whatever the rest of the material is.

The Cosmic Collection introduces a new direct-ion for Graphene Plus.
I'm totally ignorant of graphene and material science, but why is graphene better than graphite for reinforcing polymers? I don't understand the structural benefits of the graphene being super thin. Is it just that you get more 'pieces' of graphene per mass of carbon?
A single sheet of graphene is strong. If you have more sheets, such that you have thin graphite, then the sheets can easily slip over each other. So it's much less strong now, assuming when you pull on two ends of it you don't have hold of the same sheet.

I don't know what the advantage of putting lots of graphene flakes into polymers actually is.
molto tricky

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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by Grumble » Wed Mar 16, 2022 5:37 pm

WFJ wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 5:02 pm
shpalman wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 11:38 am
Well, the "graphene" in this case is probably small flakes of thin (one-to-few monolayer) graphite mixed in with whatever the rest of the material is.

The Cosmic Collection introduces a new direct-ion for Graphene Plus.
I'm totally ignorant of graphene and material science, but why is graphene better than graphite for reinforcing polymers? I don't understand the structural benefits of the graphene being super thin. Is it just that you get more 'pieces' of graphene per mass of carbon?
That could certainly be a benefit for some properties, a finer dispersion of particles would increase homogeneity for example. It might mean an increase in stiffness as well.
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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by jimbob » Thu Mar 17, 2022 9:31 am

Grumble wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 11:25 am
shpalman wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 11:21 am
Grumble wrote:
Wed Mar 16, 2022 10:37 am


There’s a truism in materials science that advances are led by the military and sports - because these are fields where people are prepared to spend money to gain advantage, so I’m less surprised to see graphene in a sports context.

You can get “graphene grip” running shoes as well.
https://www.inov-8.com/trailfly-g-270-m ... nning-shoe
It's been in skis and tennis rackets for a while now.

Sports people also do all sorts of superstitious and pseudoscientific b.llsh.t because they feel like they gain an advantage from doing so, but I'm totally sure graphene has been scientifically demonstrated to give an advantage and isn't just leveraging some fashionable science to make more money off of people.
There’s a lack of standardised testing that would demonstrate a clear advantage. I can imagine lots of tests that could be done, but I don’t think manufacturers are keen on cross-brand comparisons, and certainly wouldn’t pay for them. It’s only when safety is involved (E.g. helmets) that standard tests get used.

Are there any graphene helmets? I’ll just go off and research.
Somewhat surprisingly, the *claims* for the graphene in the running shoes are not really related to sporting performance as such.

When I replaced my previous Rocklites the new version (feels pretty much identical) supposedly has graphene in the sole, supposedly to reduce wear.

They're not race shoes, but have a decent (but not brilliant) grip in soft going whilst being comfortable on rocky ground.
Have you considered stupidity as an explanation

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Re: Unlikely uses of graphene

Post by Grumble » Thu Mar 17, 2022 9:46 am

Puncture resistance in bicycle tyres seems like something that is ideally suited to a standardised test, but I’ve not seen one yet. There are graphene tyres available which claim greater puncture resistance.
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