Sundogs etc

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tenchboy
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Sundogs etc

Post by tenchboy » Mon May 29, 2023 6:42 pm

Don't desert me Gabriel.

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jimbob
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Re: Sundogs etc

Post by jimbob » Mon May 29, 2023 7:30 pm

Nice, thanks
Have you considered stupidity as an explanation

Al Capone Junior
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Re: Sundogs etc

Post by Al Capone Junior » Tue May 30, 2023 1:37 am

I have seen complete double rainbows a few times, all in Colorado. But that's a different phenomenon. Still cool tho. But this is wild stuff.

Cue conspiracy theories on social media... :shock:

IvanV
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Re: Sundogs etc

Post by IvanV » Tue May 30, 2023 9:46 am

Atmospheric Optics is an excellent site with a complete catalogue of known phenomena and how they occur.

These are all examples of halos. Apparently the 22 degree arc - circle around the sun - sun dogs, and the tangent arc at the top are all quite common, more common than rainbows, but probably frequently overlooked, or not often appearing in as clear and bright fashion as these pictures. Considering how often I see rainbows from out of the window behind me, I must be missing them often.

The picture at the bottom on the BBC article, from near Penrith, shows some rarer halos. My reading of this diagram of rarer halos suggests it includes a supralateral arc.

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Sciolus
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Re: Sundogs etc

Post by Sciolus » Tue May 30, 2023 7:12 pm

IvanV wrote:
Tue May 30, 2023 9:46 am
These are all examples of halos. Apparently the 22 degree arc - circle around the sun - sun dogs, and the tangent arc at the top are all quite common, more common than rainbows, but probably frequently overlooked, or not often appearing in as clear and bright fashion as these pictures. Considering how often I see rainbows from out of the window behind me, I must be missing them often.
I'd say that sun dogs are roughly as frequent as rainbows in England, but the others are considerably rarer -- I've only seen a 22 degree halo a couple of times. I can think of several reasons why they may be observed proportionately less often:
- That strange psychological thing where, given a rather but not very uncommon object, you can never see it for the first several decades of your life, but then after the first observation, you get your eye in and see it regularly.
- Rainbows are well-known, so if you see one, you know what it is; whereas other atmospheric phenomena are dismissed as a sort of rainbow (e.g. the BBC's "upside down rainbow", for something very different) or just a weird glitch in the sky.
- Rainbows normally extend to ground level, whereas most other atmospheric phenomena tend to be at altitude, and we don't tend to look up that much.
- Rainbows are often very large. Sundogs tend to be quite small.
- 22 degree halos are in the direction of the sun, a direction in which people are particularly averse to looking.
Halo.jpg
Halo.jpg (112.22 KiB) Viewed 269 times

Chris Preston
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Re: Sundogs etc

Post by Chris Preston » Wed May 31, 2023 9:52 am

A number of years ago, I posted a photo I had taken of sundogs over at the other place. It was the only time I had ever seen the phenomenon that I can remember.
Here grows much rhubarb.

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